Anatomical Correction of Transposition of the Great Arteries at the Arterial Level with Dacron Patch Closure of Ventricular Septal Defect: A Video Presentation

*Ujjwal Kumar Chowdhury
Department Of Cardiothoracic And Vascular Surgery, India

*Corresponding Author:
Ujjwal Kumar Chowdhury
Department Of Cardiothoracic And Vascular Surgery, India

Published on: 2020-01-06

Abstract

We report here-in a 30 days-old male child diagnosed with D-transposition of the great arteries of the ventricular septal defect, Yacoub’s type A coronary arterial pattern undergoing anatomical correction at the arterial level with Dacron patch closure of the ventricular septal defect under moderately hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and St. Thomas (II) based cold blood cardioplegia. Postoperative recovery was uneventful at 2 months follow-up, the child is asymptomatic, on nil medications and in Ross clinical score of 2.

Keywords

Left ventricular aneurysms; Myocardial ischemia; Subvalvular aortic aneurysm; Sudden death

We report here-in a 30 days-old male child diagnosed with D-transposition of the great arteries of the ventricular septal defect, Yacoub’s type A coronary arterial pattern undergoing anatomical correction at the arterial level with Dacron patch closure of the ventricular septal defect under moderately hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and St. Thomas (II) based cold blood cardioplegia.

Transposition of the great arteries is the congenital malformation, which results from the abnormal chamber connections of atrioventricular concordance and ventriculoatrial discordance [SDD]. It is generally classified as a type of conotruncal abnormalities, a group of abnormalities that has a common theme of deranged development of the cardiac outflow tract. In D-transposition, the aorta is anterior and to the right of the pulmonary artery. This pattern results in the systemic and pulmonary circulations occurring in parallel rather than in series. These patients are subdivided into those with the intact ventricular septum (50%), ventricular septal defect (25%), and ventricular septal defect with pulmonary stenosis (25%). Other associated cardiac anomalies include persistent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of aorta and transposition of the great arteries. Transposition of the great arteries accounts for 9.9% of infants with congenital heart disease or 0.206 per 1000 live births.